Awardees of the IAPR 2017 Awards

The International Association for the Psychology of Religion has two prestigious awards for the purpose of honoring scientific work in the field of psychology of religion:

1.) The Early Career Award

The IAPR jury is very pleased to announce that despite fierce competition (with several worthy recipients among the nominees) the recipient of the 2017 early career award is Patty van Cappellen. Patty received her PhD supervision at Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, in 2012. Her dissertation dealt with the impact of positive emotions on religion and spirituality. Since then, she’s been a post-doc at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (working with Barbara Fredrickson), and is now research assistant professor at Duke. Dr. Patty van Cappellen was selected because she has consistently performed original and high quality studies on important topics in the psychology of religion and spirituality, including awe, self-transcendence, submissive thoughts and behaviors, and prosociality. Her work also impressed by a recent, pioneering experiment demonstrating that intranasal administration of oxytocin facilitates spirituality, especially among certain people with certain oxytocin related genotypes. Patty has been an active participant in the field of the psychology of religion, and an active member of the IAPR for many years.

2.) The IAPR Godin Prize for the Scientific Study of Religion

The IAPR jury is very pleased to announce that despite fierce competition (with several worthy recipients among the nominees) the IAPR 2017 Godin prize goes to Wade Rowatt, professor at Baylor University, Texas. Wade Rowatt completed his Ph.D. in experimental psychology (social-personality specialization) at the Univ. of Louisville (1997) and his B.A. in psychology and philosophy at William Jewell College (1991). Throughout his research and academic career, he has been focused almost exclusively on psychology of religion. With his students and collaborators, he has developed an important research program on religion and prejudice that advanced much further, both theoretically and methodologically (types, predictors, underlying mechanisms, and religious forms of religious prejudice; both implicit and explicit measures; both experimental and survey research), our knowledge on a topic that is both classic for the field and socially important today. He has also past and ongoing work on the psychology of humility. Overall, this work led to more than 50 publications, in journals and books in both psychology of religion and personality/social psychology; these publications have been highly cited. Finally, Dr. Rowatt has been a mentor of several PhD students who continue to serve the field today as academic faculty (in 2014, he thus received the Mentoring Award of APA Division 36). And has served the field and the community by assuming several responsibilities: founder and chair for many years of the Psychology of religion and spirituality preconference at the SPSP (Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Annual Convention, as well as associate editor of the Archives for Psychology of Religion (2012-2016) and The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion (since 2017).

Both awardees will attend the next IAPR conference at Hamar and deliver a keynote speech on their work there.

Members of the jury Sebastian Murken (President, University of Marburg, Germany), Pehr Granqvist (University of Stockholm, Sweden), Kate Loewenthal (Royal Holloway, University of London, England), Adam B. Cohen (Arizona State University, USA), Vassilis Saroglou (University of Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium).


The IAPR Godin Prize for the Scientific Study of Religion

The Godin Price iis a scientific prize to be awarded to senior scholars (mid-life award) for their excellence in the scientific study of the psychology of religion. The Godin price will be given every second IAPR conference, that is to say, once every 4 years. The prize winner is honoured by a finanical reward of 1000 euros, substantial laudatio, and the invitation to present a keynote lecture at the conference.

The origin of the Godin Prize is a gift by Gregory Zilboorg to André Godin who was professor of psychology of religion at the Lumen Vitae Institute in Brussels, on March 15, 1956 in order to develop studies in the psychology of religion. The name of the prize on that moment was the Quinquennial Prize for the Scientific Psychology of Religion. After the death of André Godin on the 2nd of June 1997, the committee decided to change the name of the prize in the Godin Prize. André Godin, as a trained practitioner in psychoanalysis, identified with the fields that became known as Pastoral Counseling and Pastoral care. On account of his interest in Clinical Psychology he was actively engaged in the field of the Psychology of Religion, which he wished to see develop as a scientific discipline in its own right.

Criteria
As mid-life award the Godin Prize is aimed at senior scholars. Eligible candidates for the Godin Prize are midlife researchers, who conduct excellentresearch (as reflected in publications) in the field of the Psychology of Religion.

Download
Obituary to André Godin by J.M. Jaspard
In Memoriam A. GODIN.pdf 
PDF-Dokument [18.3 KB]

 

Recipients of the Godin Prize:


1967 – J.P. Deconchy for "Structure génétique de l’idée de Dieu chez des catholiques français. Garçons et filles de 8 à 16 ans."


1971 – J.M. Jaspard and A. Dumoulin for "Les médiations religieuses dans l’univers de l’enfant."


1976 – L. RullaFr. Imoda and J. Ridick for "Structure psychologique et vocation."


1986 – M.J. Lerner for "The belief in a just world. A fundamental delusion."


1991 – D. Wulff for "Psychology of religion. Classic and contemporary."


1998 – S. Murken for "Gottesbeziehung und psychische Gesundheit. Die Entwicklung eines Modells und seine empirische Überprüfung."


2006 – V. Saroglou for the entire body of his research and publications in many areas of personality and social psychology of religion (see: list of publications).


2009 – P. Granqvist for his innovative research in the area of attachment theory (see: list of publications).


2013 - A.B. Cohen has an impressive record of publications almost exclusively on religion, published in top journals of personality, social, cultural, and evolutionary psychology. He is distinguished by the large diversity of topics and subfields he has worked on, the originality of the methodologies applied, the combination of many serious empirical studies with a thoughtful and original each time theorization. His major contribution to the field has been the development of cross‐religious comparative, cultural psychology‐based research on religion that has now being well inserted into the mainstream fields of social/personality/cultural psychology. More information about Adam can be found here

2017 - Wade Rowatt. Throughout his research and academic career, he has been focused almost exclusively on psychology of religion. With his students and collaborators, he has developed an important research program on religion and prejudice that advanced much further, both theoretically and methodologically (types, predictors, underlying mechanisms, and religious forms of religious prejudice; both implicit and explicit measures; both experimental and survey research), our knowledge on a topic that is both classic for the field and socially important today. He has also past and ongoing work on the psychology of humility. Overall, this work led to more than 50 publications, in journals and books in both psychology of religion and personality/social psychology; these publications have been highly cited. Finally, Dr. Rowatt has been a mentor of several PhD students who continue to serve the field today as academic faculty (in 2014, he thus received the Mentoring Award of APA Division 36). And has served the field and the community by assuming several responsibilities: founder and chair for many years of the Psychology of religion and spirituality preconference at the SPSP (Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Annual Convention, as well as associate editor of the Archives for Psychology of Religion (2012-2016) and The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion (since 2017).

 

The IAPR Early Career Award

The Early Career Award is intended to reward promising junior researchers in the field of the Psychology of Religion. It is awarded once every two years at the IAPR conference, for outstanding quality of research. Eligible for the Early Career Award are young scholars at the postdoctoral or early career academic level (holding a Ph.D. since 0 -5 years maximum). Excellence in the quality of research (as reflected in the publications) in the field of the Psychology of Religion is required.

Recipients of the Early Career Award:


2011 – Jessie Dezutter.  The first winner of the Early Career Award is Jessie Dezutter from Leuven/Belgium who was awarded at the 2011 IAPR conference in Bari/Italy (see: list of publications).

2012 - Uffe Schjodt

Download
The second winner of the Early Career Award is Uffe Schjodt from Aarhus University, Denmark who was awarded at the 2012 IAPR conference in Switzerland (see: list of publications)
List of publications_IAPR.pdf 
PDF-Dokument [90.4 KB]


2015 - Kristen Laurin
The third winner of the Early Career Award is Kristin Laurin from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.  More information about her can be found here


2017 - Patty van Cappellen. Patty received her PhD supervision at Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, in 2012. Her dissertation dealt with the impact of positive emotions on religion and spirituality. Since then, she’s been a post-doc at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (working with Barbara Fredrickson), and is now research assistant professor at Duke. Dr. Patty van Cappellen was selected because she has consistently performed original and high quality studies on important topics in the psychology of religion and spirituality, including awe, self-transcendence, submissive thoughts and behaviors, and prosociality. Her work also impressed by a recent, pioneering experiment demonstrating that intranasal administration of oxytocin facilitates spirituality, especially among certain people with certain oxytocin related genotypes. Patty has been an active participant in the field of the psychology of religion, and an active member of the IAPR for many years.

Criteria

Eligible for the Early Career Award are young scholars at the postdoctoral or early career academic level (holding a Ph.D. since 0 -5 years maximum). Excellence in the quality of research (as reflected in the publications) in the field of the Psychology of Religion is required.

Prize
Both, the Godin prize and the Early Career Award are endowed with 1000 euros. The happy winners are expected to give a keynote lecture at the annual IAPR conference in 2017 in Hamar, Norway (August 21-24).

Nomination

Suitable candidates should be nominated, however self-nominations are also possible. The application for both the Godin prize and the Early Career Award should include the candidate’s CV and the list of his/her publications and be sent to Sebastian Murken (smurken@mainz-online.de).