Does your closeness to God give you more control over your life?


Race, Religious Involvement, and Feelings of Personal Control in Middle and Late Life

Abstract

Research on differences in personal control among Blacks and Whites is conflicted. The purpose of this study is to see if differences in feelings of control between Blacks and Whites can be attributed to race differences in the use of religious resources. Developing a close relationship with God serves as the focal measure of religious involvement. The data come from a nationwide survey of middle-aged and older Blacks and Whites in the United States. A second-order factor model is embedded in a larger latent variable model that asseses the relationships among race, a close relationship with God, and feelings of personal control. The findings suggest that Blacks have a stronger sense of control than Whites. Moreover, a significant portions of these race differences can be attributed to the fact that Blacks are more likely than Whites to report they have a close relationship with God.

 

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Citation

Krause, N. (2015). Race, religious involvement, and feelings of personal control in middle and late life. Archive For The Psychology Of Religion-Archiv Fur Religionspsychologie37(1), 14-36.

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